Future_Projects

Guatemala
Choestancia
The planned project consists of: EXPANSION AND CONSTRUCTION OF THE ESTABLISHMENT'S 3 CLASSROOMS AND INFRASTRUCTURE. The Official Rural Coeducational School was founded in 1979 as a result of the parents and family members of the Choestancia community, Pitzal village, as a response to the predominant educational needs within the community. Year after year, the quantity of boys and girls in the community increases due to the need of better educational attention. Given that each year the number of children increases and we are already lacking classrooms for the children. Given this, we have thought of expanding and constructing 4 classrooms on the second level. The Engineers Without Borders program is very important for this community because there is a lack of classrooms for the children to be able to attend classes with efficiency and efficacy. Additionally, having sufficient classrooms will allow us to give and receive adequate education, the boys and girls will not need to immigrate to other states or countries because they will be able to perform and develop right here.
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Kenya
Misuuni
Misuuni village is located in Arid and Semi Arid Land of East Africa, lack of water being the major problem that poses as a threat to human survival, economic development and social security. After having held several public meetings to address the water problem, it was agreed to prioritize water in their development plan, members of this community live below the poverty level of less than a dollar a day. Women and children from Misuuni village usually walk for long distances to fetch untreated water from rivers and dams which poses a risk to their health and asserts a lot of manual labor. The village has only one earth dam which dries up during the dry season and water from this dam is untreated and it is the source of water-borne diseases in the area. For sustainability, the committee will be selling water to the local community at a minimal fee of ksh.2.00cts per 20lts jerrican of water to make it affordable by everybody in the community. Fund raising from well wishers and Government agencies to assist in project maintainace will also be conducted. The committee will contribute money on monthly basis which goes to the project Bank Account for sustainability and for any unforeseen circumstances.
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Mali
Glada
A small community of subsistence farmers in the west of Mali, the village of Glada is home to roughly 30 extended families. Since the founding Glada roughly 60 years ago, the community has been steadily growing as a connecting road to the Bamako-Kita highway was built and a dam irrigation system has improved the farmlands. Few items are brought in from outside the community, and therefore the arable land surrounding the community is heavily relied upon for food, medicines, and housing materials. Rain and what water can be found is one of the biggest limiting factors in how much can be grown on the land here; the rainy season in Glada is short and the water table low. Jekabarra, the partnering organization, and the community as a whole continually seek methods and resources to improve access to water, water conservation, and farming techniques for water retention. A dam and irrigation system that had been functioning for nearly 20 years had greatly help raise the water table and make more land arable, as well as provide a critical protein source in the fish that inhabited the back-fill lake. Several years ago the cement of the dam structure broke, and water no longer is held in the lake and fields. With assistance in repairing the structure, as well as other potential future projects to improve access to water both for irrigation and drinking, will allow for the current Glada community and its future generations to better cultivate nutritious foods to help alleviate the severe malnutrition present in every family, drink cleaner water and avoid many currently present bacterial diseases, as well as possible generate income from catching fish and selling surplus agriculture through transportation to the main road to Bamako and Kita.
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Rwanda
Bungwe
Many members of the community are struggling to have enough water for each day and are living below the accepted standard of 20L per person per day. Community members struggle to bring the water to their homes and use great amounts of time and energy to accomplish this. Access to water is limited especially in the dry season. At that time community members must fetch water using plastic water cans they carry down and up the hill to the spring. It is hoped that water could be made accessible at the top of the hill year-round. There is already a small water pump in place to achieve this, but it is not sufficiently strong. There are water stations spaced at intervals of about 50m along the road at the top of the hill. It is hoped that these stations could be made more dense or that water could be directed to homes. It is hoped that the water quality could also be improved. The community could use help with some other issues and hopefully an assessment will highlight the most pressing needs. Other possible projects could include irrigation for farms, building a library, expanding the clinic/hospital, accessibility to electricity and road improvement
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Tanzania
Ngaruma
Ngaruma Parish is a sub-location of Marangu Village. Subsistence farming is the main source of livelihood. In the last 30 years the community has experienced steady decline and stagnation, primarily due to low coffee prices, population growth, HIV/ADS, global competition and structural adjustment policies. Over 20% of families are below poverty line. In 2007 a task force identified access to primary education and reducing youth unemployment as priority issues. This is because preschool attendance is required for entry to primary school and majority of children completing primary school have no job skills. The aims is to increase chances for success for children in an increasingly competitive world and for gainful employment for youth. We currently offer preschool education to 138 children at two locations. While these represent a small fraction of the unmet need it is a step in the right direction. We have a small plot of land. The goal of our infrastructure capacity building program is to expand education and training and to improve sanitation in the preschools.
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Uganda
Nakyenyi
The program will seek to build a demonstration biogas plant at the Nakyenyi Vocational School using ISSB technology. The demonstration plant will consist of a small residential sized digester that could be implemented in households owning only a few cattle as well as a large institutional sized digester for large farms. The two units will be designed for repeated implementation at future sites. Construction activities will be conducted by the construction program at Nakyenyi Vocational School with expert supervision in ISSB technology use provided by the Lwengo Rural Development Support Organization.
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Uganda
Oloo
Traditionally, 95% are subsistence farmers with families, in plentiful, fertile land, but with few skills. This project will focus on ensuring that the population - predominantly young - is empowered with skills to kick-start the regions economic recovery by growing for income and trading in identified markets. The decision for the proposed project was reached after several meetings and brainstorming with key leaders in the villages and was unanimously agreed upon that priority be given to the provision of clean water, food security and income generation. Therefore we propose that solar-powered drip irrigation is the way to solution to the needs of the proposed communities.
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